New Acquisition – 1897 Railway Timetable

Our small collection of railway-related items has been enhanced thanks to this generous donation of a 1897 North British Railway Timetable and two rail tickets. The tickets appear to date from the 1850s and 1860s and relate to commercial trade between Dundee and London.

We hope to find out more about these items later this year during Neale Elder’s talk on 12th September titled ‘The Dundee to Arbroath Railway: From Pioneering Line to Trunk Route’.

Do you have any local railway items that you would consider donating to the museum? If so, we would love to hear from you!

Audi 80 Donated

The museum would like to thank Mr John A. Smith for donating his Audi 80. John received his new 1994 Audi 80 from Lex Retail Group in Dundee on the 3rd of December 1994. He has been the proud owner of the car for 25 years until he donated it to the museum last week.  Along with the car John has kindly included various pieces of paperwork about the car including service invoices, instruction manual and DVLA letters. John was also able to supply the museum with two brochures about the Audi 80, both of which are in very good condition.

Back in 1994 Audi 80 Saloon was an impressive and luxurious car for all those who owned one. John’s car has a 1.6 litre engine, was capable of reaching 62 mph (miles per hour) in 13.4 seconds and could achieve a top speed of 111 mph. The Audi 80 came equipped with a 5 speed gear box, 5 forward gears and reverse, and the estate model even boasted a Final Drive Ratio. The base model came with a 4-cylinder engine and this was capable of producing 130 Nm of Torque and 100 bhp (brake horse power). The stats for the Audi 80 were impressive for a saloon car that weighed 1230 kg (the estate model came in at 1270 kg). In the 90s, the Audi 80 was a stylish and comfortable way to travel whether you were cruising around town or clocking up the miles on long drives down the motorway.

We at the Dundee Museum of Transport are very grateful to John for donating his Audi 80 to us and we are happy to give it a new home here.

Donor Mr Smith with Museum Manager Sam and the Audi 80

On this day: 3rd April (1832), the full extent of the Dundee and Newtyle Railway line opens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

George Kinloch, Dundee’s first elected MP, was a great supporter of the idea of a Dundee and Newtyle railway. In 1826, Kinloch piloted a Bill through Parliament, leading to the creation of the Dundee and Newtyle Railway Company – wherein he swiftly took upon himself the position of Elected Chairman. Charles Landale, a civil engineer within Dundee, proposed two routes in which the new railway should go through. One route would go from Dundee to Forfar via Douglastown, before making its way to Mill of Newtyle, whilst the other route would take a direct route from Dundee to Mill of Newtyle. The latter route was chosen. The railway would provide Newtyle with potential for growth, as it was a promising industry. However, it was difficult to reach from Dundee. Prior to the construction of the railway, the only mode of transport to Newtyle was a stagecoach to and from Blairgowrie that only came 2-3 times a week during the summer months. Furthermore, with the industrial nature of Newtyle, the railway would offer the working-class citizens of Dundee a cheap method of travelling to Newtyle. A final major benefit of this railway line was its ability to transport various products (such as coal) cheaply between the two towns. In 1831 the railway was officially opened and was one of the earliest railway lines in operation.

For passengers, during the summer, the train would run four times daily – at 8am, 10:30am, 1pm and 4pm. In the winter the train would miss out the 1pm timeslot available during the summer. First-class passengers would pay 1s. 6d.; second-class passengers would pay 1s. 3d.; and third-class passengers would pay 1s. Due to the train company making a loss in its later years, an ‘extra first-class’ was added to the fare prices – at 1s. 8d. The carriages of the train were divided into compartments for the respective classes: first-class had the most room, with a single carriage, split into three compartments, each holding eight passengers. Third-class travellers would have to make-do with a great number of passengers crammed into open compartments. The trains would also carry all kinds of goods: from manure, to coal, to bricks, slates and stones. Charges would be made according to the number of tonnes the goods weighed, and the mileage required. Pricing would be divided into 4 miles, 4-7 miles, over 7 miles and any distance. Dundee and Newtyle Railway Company employed 26 different roles. The Manager at the top, who would be paid £70 a year; a humongous salary in comparison to the ten-way men at the bottom. The annual cost of the railway (including coal, maintenance, wages, etc.) would cost £3,400.

The Company was unprofitable for its shareholders, and there was an unsuccessful attempt at raising the prices of third-class passenger fares from 1s. to 1s. 3d. in 1836. This had caused a decline in the number of passengers from 40,378 to 29,387, further causing the Company’s profits to dwindle and forcing the Company to return their prices to their prior state after just nine months. Various accidents were happening to the railway workers due to bad design in some areas, or simply due to negligence from other staff. This gave the Company a bad reputation. Thomas Coupar a porter, was working on the railway track in Dundee on the 23rd April 1841. He was killed after another member of staff failed to alert Coupar that the train was about to move off. A year later, the Inspector-General of Railways inspected the Company’s railway line, leaving a scathing report on the many technical issues present. Both the financial and practical issues lead to the eventual demise of the Dundee and Newtyle Railway company. In 1865, the Company’s railway line was absorbed by the Caledonian Railway company, before the Caledonian Railway Company was taken over by London Midland and Scottish lines in 1923. In 1948, the railways of the UK were nationalised. The final death of this railway line itself was to occur in 1967, when the very last section of the line – the route from Ninewells Junction to Maryfield – was closed.

Information and photographs from:
Dundee Museums and Art Galleries Extension Services, 1981. Albert Square, Dundee, DD1 1DA, now: The McManus, Leisure and Culture Dundee.

Recent Acquisition: Ticket Machines belonging to Dundee’s ‘Mr Transport’ 

Bus Ticket Machine

 A recent donation to the Dundee Museum of Transport reveals the life of the ‘Mr Transport’ of Dundee, near 52 year to the day that he retired from the industry.

 Born in 1902, Charles Broadley’s early life revolved around transport.  Before he had even left school, Charles worked part-time as a ‘parcel lad’, on Friday nights and Saturdays.  After his school day, he would eagerly wait for the Blackie tram to turn onto Blackness Street, always offering to help reverse the trolleys.  After Charles left school, he joined Dundee Corporation Transport, working as a full-time parcel lad.  At the age of sixteen, he spent a brief three years in the Royal Air Force before returning to Dundee Corporation Transport. 

 Charles’ passion for transport never fizzled out during his many years at Dundee Corporation Transport.  He worked diligently, gradually working his way through the ranks.  Starting as a parcel lad, he then became a lorry driver; then a conductor; a tram driver; a bus driver; then received a semi-final promotion to an Inspector in 1928.

Throughout the years, he displayed amazing dedication.  He remained with the transport industry, despite the move by many to factory work, with its more forgiving hours.  He would often leave one of his favourite activities – attending football matches at Dens Park – to help buses cope with the massive crowds there.  He would leave his home in Barnes Avenue in the wee hours of the night to respond to emergencies, such as sanding icy roads, or showing face at any crashes that may have occurred.  In 1947, Charles received his final promotion to Traffic Superintendent.  His dedication and loyalty to Dundee Corporation Transport  during his forty-five years there earned him the title ‘Mr Transport’, lovingly given to him by Dundonians. 

In 1966, after forty-five years service, Charles retired.  However, his love for transport remained.  He would continue to go on holiday to the likes of Switzerland and Austria – via the bus, of course.  In 1978 Charles sadly passed away.  However, his legacy lives on in Dundee and further afield through his prediction that, one day, in the future, there will be a “one-man bus”. 

Charles Broadley’s ticket machine will go on display at Dundee Museum of Transport from February 2019 when the museum re-opens after the winter break.  The museum would like to thank Iain Waddell for donating these items in memory of his late Grandfather.

Victoria Alexandrina Drummond: Britain’s first female Marine Engineer

A career not suitable for a lady

Victoria Alexandrina Drummond was born in 1894 at Megginch Castle near Errol. Victoria showed her interest in mechanics from an early age but didn’t start her career until 1922, where she sailed as 10th engineer on board SS Anchises. Due to her gender, Victoria never managed to gain her British Chief Engineers, despite making 37 attempts. However, she was successful in gaining a Panamanian Chief Engineers Certificate.

During the mid-1940’s Victoria was part of the SS Bonita at Southampton. It was that time when Victoria was acknowledged and took charge of the engine room and kept herself the engines running after an attack by enemy bombers. When arriving at Virginia, she was given a hero’s welcome. Victoria was awarded an MBE for her devotion to duty and a Lloyds medal for bravery at sea.

She kept on sailing in various vessels and she sailed amongst many convoys during the rest of the war. After the war ended she sailed as Second Engineer until 1959 when she finally became Chief Engineer. She remained a Chief Engineer until she retired in 1962.

Victoria died in 1978 and was buried at her birth place. She will always be remembered as Britain’s first female Marine Engineer, first female Chief Engineer, and first female member of the Institute of Marine Engineers. She stood up to all adversity and opened the door for all the women that followed in her footsteps. Victoria is a key part of the Dundee Museum of Transport’s Caledon Shipyard display. She is also part of Dundee women’s trail and a plaque is devoted to her, located at Bell Street.

 

Tay Rail Bridge Disaster

Do you have any objects relating to the Tay Rail Bridge Disaster? We are building a display on this very topic however we don’t have many objects in our own collection.

If you have any objects, please get in touch with the museum manager Sam on manager@dmoft.co.uk or call 01382 455196 to discuss a potential loan.

 

Renault Twizy

 

The Renault Twizy is a battery-powered electric city car designed and marketed by Renault. Twizys are completely built by hand by some of the highest paid workers in the world at Renault’s Z.E. (zero emissions) facility in Valladolid, Spain.

Electric cars are likely to become the most used types of vehicles in the future. They use stored chemical energy just like a conventional car but they release this energy electrochemically without any kind of combustion. There’s no burning of fuel, no air pollution from the tailpipe; no emissions of any kind are produced by the car itself once it is on the road.

The Twizy was the top-selling plug-in electric vehicle in Europe during 2012. Renault’s target of selling 15,000 Twizys worldwide was achieved in April 2015.

 

 

Going Once… Going Twice… SOLD to Dundee Museum of Transport

The museum is very pleased with its most recent acquisition: a Panda Police Car purchased on eBay!

A lot of work will go into restoring this 1970s Panda car that served in Dundee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 1970’s Morris Minor is the last of its kind as far as we know, having faithfully served in Dundee’s Police Force.

Having secured the latest addition to the museums collection, after picking it up on a 19-hour round trip to Rugby, the intention now will be to finish what the sellers, Tom and Wendy, started: to return the car to its full glory and put it on display.

This latest addition is in very good shape and with a well-preserved chassis. The original interior has been retained with all the necessary parts. The previous owners have also kindly donated their collected memorabilia — including roof lights, a police radio and some original badges and buttons from a uniform.

The Museum hopes to unveil the car, fully restored, this summer.