Standard Motor Company – Little Nine – 1933 (United Kingdom)

Founded in Coventry in 1903 by R.W. Maudslay, the Standard Motor Company was financed by Sir John Wolfe-Barry through a £3,000 gift.

Their first car was in production by the end of 1903 and featured a single cylinder engine. Production had increased thanks to expansion into larger 6-cylinder engine cars by 1906. To accommodate this, a new factory was moved in to; though the company had switched to aviation production during the First World War and manufactured over 1,000 aircraft.

The post-First World War era saw vehicle production resume, with 10,000 cars manufactured by 1924. Smaller and more streamlined vehicles were being produced by the late 1920s: such as the fabric bodied 9hp Fulham. Other manufacturers including Jensen, Avon, and Swallow were to purchase Standard Motor Company chassis.

The rear-wheel drive 1933 Standard Little Nine had two main bearings, coil ignition, 12-volt electrics, four speed silent third gearbox, and a cart spring frame. It had a 1,005cc/1,006cc 4-cylinder side valve engine producing 22bhp with a top speed of 54/55mph. Weighing 16cwt, the Standard Nine was the smallest and cheapest car available from the Standard Motor Company in the early 1930s (costing around £145 at the time). This was regarded during the period as expensive for a ‘family car’, though this model sold well with the ‘upper echelons of society’.

The saloon was available in several colours. It featured fine quality leather upholstery, with matching head cloth and pile carpet. Front seats were independently adjustable, and the four doors feature wind-up windows. All doors feature a locking device, and room for maps and other driving articles (including dashboard space for parcels). Other objects of the car include a rear vision mirror, protection glass, screen wiper, speedometer, clock, oil pressure gauge, electric horn, tool kit, licence holders and luggage grid (with spare wheel when new).

The Dundee Museum of Transport’s Standard Little Nine is the final production year MK II Ordinary model; though a ‘special coachbuilders saloon’ was manufactured too. Around 5,680 saloons were manufactured in total. A small amount of 2 door convertibles were produced to special order, though this made the convertibles very rare (with as little as 12 ever made).

 

 

References (all accessed on 10/01/2019):

Culshaw; Horrobin (1974). Complete Catalogue of British Cars. London: Macmillan. ISBN 0-333-16689-2.

https://www.standardmotorclub.org/post-vintage-commission-numbers.html

https://www.classicandsportscar.com/guides/classic-cars-a-to-z/standard-little-nine

 

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